Posted by: Ayuda | July 28, 2009

Poco a Poco July

Saludos!  We celebrate this past week with more sterilizations and vaccinations, a special adoption announcement, and we begin plans to step into a new nest of opportunities here in Panajachel as a new month quickly approaches.

Cumbiya  23-Jul-09

Cumbiya 23-Jul-09

Cumbiya is a mother who recently delivered 6 pups, had the pups taken away from her, and was then abandoned by her family.   Since then, one of Ayuda’s local resident volunteers has been fostering Cumbiya in the hopes of one day finding her a permanent home.  Cumbiya recently received the base-line Ayuda health care treatments.  She was sterilized, vaccinated, and treated for internal and external parasites.  We think that she is not quite 2 years old.  Please contact us if would like more information about adopting Cumbiya.

Spotter On The Job   25-Jul-09

Spotter On The Job 25-Jul-09

In contrast to Cumbiya, Spotter is the kind of street dog who may never want to settle down with one companion or family.   This little fireplug loves to hang out on a busy street in front of a clothing shop or down by a key shop where young men lift weights (how she got her name).  A very street-smart gal, Spotter was recently sterilized, vaccinated, and also treated for parasites.  She was then returned to her little corner of the community where she is well known and watched over by caring humans.  She is now getting a daily ration of high protein food from Ayuda.  We’d put up a better picture of Spotter if we had one, but this one shows what is clearly her favorite and normal pose in her favorite and normal spot on the street.

Mamushka   9-Jul-09

Mamushka 9-Jul-09

In other good news report, we are very pleased to announce that we have found a wonderful home for Mamushka, our recovering cancer patient.   An adoption of a street dog Mamushka’s age and under her circumstances is quite rare and special.  Stay tuned for a future post with more information.

Dock Mother   26-Jul-09

Dock Mother 26-Jul-09

Turning to new work ahead, the other day a young man stopped us on the street and asked if we were the people who run the program for homeless animals.  He asked us to follow him on his motorcycle as he lead us to a section of town which Ayuda has not yet entered.    The boat dock for the lake’s western shore villages is overrun with homeless female dogs.   As part of our August plan, we will begin an approach to do what we can for these newly discovered “chicas”.   Locals who work by the docks and operate the tiendas have offered their help to capture and provide post-op care.  This area of Panajachel is very sectionalized.  We believe that it could be quickly and methodically cleaned up.  Our greatest obstacle is available funds in order to pay for the necessary medical services and supplies.

During August we will focus our efforts on fighting deadly diseases through vaccinations.   It seems like almost daily we have been hearing disturbing tales of suffering and death that could have been prevented.   According to Dr. Miguel, there has been a significant increase in cases of Parvo and Distemper in Panajachel during 2009.  Rabies vaccines are offered free of charge by the Guatemalan Health Department, but vaccines to fight Parvo, Distemper and other deadly diseases must be purchased privately.   Through our ever-increasing network of local volunteers, we will directly administer injections and keep records of series treatments, as well as continue the Ayuda standard of vaccinations for all animals that we spay/neuter.

For $30 an animal is spay/neutered and fully vaccinated by the Ayuda vet.  For $10 an animal is separately vaccinated by the Ayuda vet.  For $300 we can acquire a case of 100 vital vaccines that will be administered by the trained hands of unpaid volunteers.  Many of these vaccines will be given to dogs and cats that have already been spay/neutered, but the owners have no knowledge of their vaccinations or series treatment schedules.

Please donate whatever you can to help us eliminate animal suffering caused by local deadly diseases.  Vaccinations are vital for all the animals who live in this environment; especially the homeless and those who cannot afford to pay.

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Responses

  1. Wonderful work Selaine! You’ve accomplished so much in so little time. I’m amazed at how far a small amount of money will go there. 30 US here in Japan will not even cover the cost for a basic vaccine. Look forward to more posts!


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